Pilot study to evaluate the impact of respiratory syncytial virus in the community, in children under 5 and adults over 65
 
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1
Department of Translational Research, N.T.M.S., University of Pisa Department of Translational Research, N.T.M.S., University of Pisa Via San Zeno, n. 37-39, 56127 Pisa Italy
 
2
Department of Translational Research, N.T.M.S., University of Pisa Via San Zeno, n. 37-39, 56127 Pisa Italy
 
3
Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine, University of Bari Italy
 
4
Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan Italy
 
5
Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa Italy
 
6
Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome Italy
 
7
Department of Translational Research, N.T.M.S., University of Pisa Italy
 
8
Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest Italy
 
 
Publication date: 2023-04-26
 
 
Popul. Med. 2023;5(Supplement):A1937
 
ABSTRACT
Background:
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the main cause of hospitalization for acute respiratory infection (ARI; WHO case definition) in children under 5 years and the third viral cause of hospital admission in over 65. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the burden of RSV-related disease in the primary care setting, to support future prevention strategies. Secondary objectives are 1) to describe the epidemiological trend of ARIs, 2) to identify the predictive parameters of the clinical presentation severity, complications, socio-economic and healthcare impact.

Methods:
As part of the RSVComNet project, in 2019/20 and 2021/22 winter seasons, in Lazio, Puglia, Liguria and Lombardia regions (representing 40% of the Italian population), children under 5 years with ARI were enrolled and subjected to a nasopharyngeal swab for the differential diagnosis of the main respiratory infectious agents. Parents of RSV-positive children completed a 14-day and 30-day follow-up questionnaire. In 2022/23, Tuscany will also participate in the study, also enrolling adults over 65.

Results:
In 2019/20 and 2021/22, 493 children were diagnosed with ARI and 187 (37.9%) were positive for RSV. The median disease duration was 9.5 days (IQR 7-14), with a median of 1 extra visit by their pediatrician (IQR: 1-2). 12 children (6.6%) were hospitalized (10

ISSN:2654-1459