Assessment of vaccination coverage in patients with functional or surgical asplenia: analysis of vaccination coverage for pneumococcus and influenza in the population of Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Friuli Centrale
 
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1
Dipartimento Area Medica, Università degli Studi di Udine, Italy
 
2
Dipartimento Area Medica Università degli Studi di Udine, Italy
 
3
Dipartimento di Prevenzione Azienda Sanitaria, Universitaria Friuli Centrale, Italy
 
 
Publication date: 2023-04-27
 
 
Popul. Med. 2023;5(Supplement):A2058
 
ABSTRACT
Background and Objective: A patient with asplenia has a greater susceptibility and an increased risk of developing invasive infectious diseases or severe complications, preventable with vaccination by some micro-organisms such as Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Influenza Virus. Preventing infectious diseases through vaccinations is a priority in public health; therefore, it’s essential to investigate vaccination coverage in our target population. The study’s objectives are primarily to analyze whether the target population has adhered to the pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations and, subsequently, to assess the difference in vaccination coverage across age groups with a particular focus on completed and partial vaccination courses. Finally, evaluate the proper vaccine counseling for the target category. Methods: The population sample was analyzed through the survey of the Regional Epidemiological Repository and subsequent analysis. Patients with surgical or functional asplenia were studied from 01/01/1995 to 27/12/2020, divided by age groups starting from five years of age. Results: The statistical analyses of subjects affected by surgical/functional asplenia (660 subjects) highlight complete pneumococcal vaccination coverage (sequential schedule) equal to 52.88%; partial coverage corresponding to 25.75% and 21.37% of patients who are not vaccinated for pneumococcus. Concerning the coverage of influenza in the target population, we see full coverage (annual vaccination performed) of 30.45%; partial (at least one vaccination from the date of diagnosis) equal to 46.66% and 22.89% of subjects are not vaccinated for influenza at all. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that a considerable part of the target population doesn’t have adequate disease protection because 47.12 % of subjects have partial or no courses against pneumococcus, and 69.55 % of patients have partial or no courses against influenza. The assessment will consider the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the vaccinations under study. It’s necessary to undertake vaccination catch-up and mop-up strategies to improve current coverage in the studied population.
ISSN:2654-1459