RESEARCH PAPER
Responsibility of dentist towards tobacco quitting: Perceptions of dental students
Devaki Talluri 1  
,   Srinivas Pachava 1  
,   Vadapalli Viswanadh 1  
,   Viswa C. Chandu 1  
,   Suresh Y. Chand 1  
,   Naditha K. Rani 1  
 
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Department of Public Health Dentistry, Sibar Institute of Dental Sciences, Guntur, India
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Devaki Talluri   

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Sibar Institute of Dental Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, 520008, India
Submission date: 2019-04-23
Final revision date: 2019-06-30
Acceptance date: 2019-10-25
Publication date: 2019-11-15
 
Popul. Med. 2019;1(November):5
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Tobacco dependence is a chronic disease that often requires repeated intervention and multiple attempts to quit. Effective treatment exists however, that can significantly increase rates of long-term abstinence. Our objective was to evaluate the perceptions and primary domains of attitudes of dental students with reference to tobacco cessation counselling.

Methods:
The study involved 62 male students and 138 female students, for a total of 200 responses, in Andhra Pradesh, India. Principle component analysis with varimax rotation was used to identify inter-item associations, to check for rudimentary items, and to establish underlying constructs among items. Internal consistency and reliability were assessed using Cranbach’s alpha. Two principle-component analyses were conducted. In the first analysis with 20 items, the KMO and Bartlett’s test showed a sampling adequacy of 0.704 and significance with p<0.001. The internal consistencies of the two components were 0.814 and 0.783, respectively.

Results:
The mean age of the dental students who participated was 22.2±0.5 years. Lengthy clinical procedures and lack of time to give cessation counselling at the dental office were the main barriers among 66% of the study subjects. Patient resistance to quitting tobacco use was also another strong barrier identified by 52% students. In comparison to previous research, the principle-component analysis of our data revealed that effectiveness remained as a discrete factor. Professional responsibility and scope of dental practice collapsed into one factor, which we identified as scope and responsibility. A new factor, identified as prescriptions, also emerged as a significant domain.

Conclusions:
Health care providers can play a vital role in helping their patients attempt and realize tobacco cessation as it was clearly evident that dental students were in acceptance of tobacco cessation counselling as an integral part of oral health delivery. The treatment of tobacco dependence should be included in the dental curriculum.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
There was no source of funding for this research.
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
 
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